Tag Archives: Bucks Bags

Cooper Lake July 2017

Headed back to Cooper Lake this summer, just for a day after reading about WDFW throwing some 3-4lb trout in early in June. I rowed into the wind, which brought me to the NW section of the lake. This is shallower water and where the Cooper River feeds into the lake. Hooked up with lots of small fish trolling a woolly bugger and even caught my first Kokanee. It was great fun just letting tons of line out and having them hit about a mile off the back of the pontoon.

 

Summer & Fall Salmon 2017

This post will document my limited fishing endeavors this summer and fall. With a new addition to our family this past spring, I’ve been understandably called upon to spend more time at home. This means no BC trip this year, but more focus on beach fishing and new additions to my rod and tackle collection as I focus on landing salmon closer to home.  Luckily its a pink year and I’ve had some friends pass off some knowledge they’ve gained past summers hooking coho from the beach.

 

Skykomish Coho Fall 2016

Hooked only two Coho this Fall season on the Skykomish but I’m happy with that considering I only made two trips out. The first was on October 2nd on the Upper Snohomish and the last this past Sunday farther upstream on the Sky, about a mile downstream of Sultan.

Snohomish Coho

The second one got off nearly as quickly as it was on and the river couldn’t have been more different, running at about 6000cfs and only about a foot of visibility. We still were able to scout some promising new runs and get skunked on the old-reliables, Both my fish were hooked on a 50/50 BC Steel Pen-Tac spoon.

Cooper Lake

Took the pontoon up to Cooper Lake after having been to the lake in late-June on a scouting mission with my wife. She and I had caught a couple fish on that afternoon and  knew I needed to comeback with the boat as the lake is a perfect size (130 acres) for exploring under oar-power.

It was a bit windy so I started my day at the top of the lake, anticipating that I’d want to get the hard rowing done early.  I anchored at a few spots and caught stocked trout at each one using bait. I’ve been trying to move away from all bait use in all of my fishing but I’ll lean on it occasionally to avoid getting skunked. I trolled and cast spinners all day and never got a hit, but bait consistently got fish in the net. By 3pm in the afternoon I could see good-size brook trout rising to the gnat hatch that came on in full force in shallower waters. Dry flies would have been a great option had I brought my fly rod. It had taken a tumble out the bed of my truck at about 45mph last weekend and I honestly can’t bring myself to even look at in it’s scratched up, wonky-guide state.

Cooper Lake is beautiful and I can’t say the wind was as much of a problem. Bring an anchor (mine’s 8lbs and barely held) and find one of the numerous coves that helps shelter the wind.

Seep Lakes 2016

With new pontoon in tow I headed out to camp at Potholes State Park and fish the Seep Lakes over the weekend of April 9th-11th. I had fished a few of the lakes two years ago around the same time of year. WDFW describes the lakes as “within the ‘channeled scablands’ of Eastern Washington, that were created by ice age floods during the Pleistocene Epoch.” In less poetic but more descriptive text, they are a group of over 50 lakes that were formed when the Potholes Reservoir was formed and the water starting moving through the water table and arising from the desert south-east of the reservoir.

Potholes Site #84

Not a lot has been written in the way of consistent fishing reports from the lakes. What is known that various of the lakes have been stocked a few times over the last ten years, with some holding big trout and some holding none. It is also known that some of the lakes were poisoned at one point or another over the last five years in order to clear out carp that had found their way in via the irrigation channels connected to the Columbia. It was hard for me to get any clear timeline of what had been poisoned and when. This made it hard to be confident in the only two lakes that we chose to fish during our time there. There was barely any surface activity and depths were scratched out for us via Scott’s sonar, which were helpful to know in colored up water.

Launch at Carol Lake

We fished Corral on Saturday from mid-morning to after lunchtime. It’s a longer lake with pocketed channels and typical rocky points and walls which is where we concentrated our efforts. I fished a spinner that Scott had made with a black snowman body and wide, heavy gold Colorado blade. Scott found me a drop off on the sonar and marked some fish. I was having oar issues and stubbornly left my motor at home so that I could experience the ride of my new watercraft.   I dropped anchor and cast into the deep, let the spinner sink for about 10-15 seconds and slowly reeled. My thought was that the spinner would be reeled in at an angle matching the incline of the bottom towards where I was anchored. I was thinking too much.  There was a fair amount of snags to be had and the water clarity was a bit rough.  Regardless, I hooked a  nice fish close to 9am and then nothing the rest of the day.

Corral Lake Lunker

After a siesta we stacked the pontoons on my truck and headed to Blythe Lake, which is just a hop over the hill from Corral. Blythe is smaller and more manageable in a pontoon or float tube, had some great structure and scenery, but was a soupy mess from aquatic plants coloring up the water. About an hour before sunset there was an intense gnat hatch along with some emerging insects of some sort that brought on our first real surface activity of the day. What I was convinced was the same fish made it’s way from the boat launch south across the lake, periodically coming up for a thrashing gulp. We got zero bites but were somehow satisfied that at least we knew they were there. The lake had not been poisoned.

Blythe Lake

Below is a map of the area. The first lake is a few minutes away from Potholes. The Clark-Skamania Flyfishers were a great resource and I would encourage taking at least a couple days and buddies to try and hit as many lakes as you can. I’d like to take a trip there in the fall with some time set aside for hiking in to some of the lakes only accessible by foot.

 

Scan 4