Tag Archives: camping

Jameson Lake

A coordinated long weekend among a tight group of fishing buddies can provide a game that extends long before and after the days you take off from work. The looking-forward-to and looking-back-on makes a trip a worthy endeavor, despite having to go through the motions of aligning all of our schedules and communicating to our loved ones that this was a great idea. We earned it or we would pay for it were the foundations of every conversation with wives and girlfriends.  The road you took from the get-go dictated your every angle from that point on.

Jameson Lake is about 200 miles from Seattle, north of Ephrata and can be reached from I-90 or Highway 2.  It is in the sagebrush flats region of Washington and quite simply a long lake in the middle of the desert. The 500 acre lake is a split-season and opens the fourth Saturday of April and closes on July 4th until October when it opens again. On it’s east side, Jameson Lake Road extends along the shore and to the top of the upper section or “old lake” which was the smaller body of water that existed before the lake doubled in size.  A study for the Foster Creek Conservation District said that “since first surveyed in the mid-1880’s, Jameson Lake has doubled in size and water levels have reportedly continued to rise several feet in the past 15 years, possibly as a result of agricultural practices in the surrounding watershed.”

Jameson Lake Boat Launch

I talked with an old-timer for a while who had fished the lake most years since 1957. We heard stories about when the lake had been half the size and the fish twice as big.  He was carrying four fiberglass rods rigged with silver or bronze spoons that he had used for twenty years. Friday’s limit was caught on silver spoons and today, bronze spoons were the ticket.  Modern spoons and their fancy split rings didn’t sit well with him, and he was worried that he’d run out of spoons before he died or couldn’t fish any more. The old-timer referenced a plug in his tackle box that had been fished by his grandfather.  I asked him about the chances of losing such an heirloom and he said that if you fished the plug and lost it, you went swimming.  I truly respected his choice of technique. No bait and only targeting fish that will hit hard near the surface from a long way off the back of a boat.

Jameson Lake Cliffs

His fishing partner had been his across-the-street neighbor for thirty years. Her name was Bonnie and I thought back on the morning when we saw them heading out, politely inquiring if we’d stayed dry through the night’s rain. Bonnie and her husband were great friends and neighbors of the old-timer and his wife.  Bonnie’s husband passed from Alzheimer’s and then the old-timer’s did the same a couple years after that. With both of their partners gone and a few years of grieving gone by, the old-timer and Bonnie partnered up. They both liked camping, fishing, baseball and most importantly: one another’s company. They could share the stories of their lost partners, embedded with a context only known by someone who was there when it all happened.  Bonnie and the old-timer and the lost husband and wife had been great friends and shared many memories together raising their families as neighbors in a small community.  Bonnie and the old-timer knew  that together they could watch a baseball game on TV and both agree that it was better than seeing it in person, because you got to see more. They knew they could enjoy the outdoors together and camp and fish  and start building their own traditions together.

It was a dense interaction with the old-timer in that short amount of time. Our campsite forced pleasantries in the least as we were situated right behind the facilities and resort office/restaurant/general store.  We were situated on two of the tent sites available at Jack’s Resort, with the majority of the small property being reserved for RVs. There are multiple boat launches on the lake and Jack’s will rent you a boat without a motor for $30 a day. We brought our own electric motors but if you wanted to use their gas motors it would cost $60. The boats were leaky but tracked well. I wouldn’t suggest anchoring anywhere you couldn’t see the bottom without sonar. The lake runs up to a 130′ deep at points.

Our group fished a variety of methods, with trolling and casting spinners surprisingly being the most productive. Most fisherman were using bait off the bottom and that turned out to work just fine, but was a bit boring and tough to manage from a non-anchored boat on the lake. All weekend there were periodic squalls of sideways rain and with the cloud cover I stuck to bronze spinners, but silver worked as well once the sun came through the clouds. After a day’s fishing we took a break and headed into the surrounding hills to set up a firing range where we could test out our friend’s arsenal of handguns. Jameson Lake is a great, remote lake that provided consistent fishing this late spring. WDFW looks like they stock it again in October and I would love to head back and try it again once the trout population is allowed the chance to get a little bigger.

Jameson Lake Shooting

Deception Pass & San Juan Halibut

I was invited to fish for halibut by a friend and his girlfriend’s dad and dad’s co-worker. I stayed in Anacortes Thursday night and we checked out at 4am to meet Steve and drive to the launch at Washington Park. There we met Rydell, whose boat we would be taking out and who proved to be an incredible guide. He’d live in or very near to Anacortes all his life. His system for fishing halibut was very dialed in and meticulous. From the choice of waters to the anchor system to the chum-on-the-downrigger. We anchored in about 113 feet of water (shallower than I expected) and Rydell got all the gear in the water promptly after a lesson on rigging the herring and the rational behind using both octopus and herring (rigged to look like the octopus is attacking the herring). Our phone service was alternating between towers in Canada and the US. We hooked two big halibut before 11am. I reeled in a 61lb fish and Perry, about an hour later, a 45lb fish. In checking in with the fish checker we learned that these were the two biggest fish caught at least two of the launches in the area. I’d like to think they were the two biggest fish in the state caught that day.

After being on the water for 12 hours, we docked and Perry and I went to Deception Pass where he and I would stay for a night and he left in the morning. I had three more friends coming up to meet me from Seattle and they arrived close to 11am and we tried fishing for searun cutthroat underneath the Deception Pass Bridge and then loaded up the pontoons to try and fish Pass Lake.

Three Pontoons In A Truck

Pass is a flyfishing-only lake that we were undergunned for. The fish were deep and our flys were not. I also fished Cranberry Lake and hooked about three fish and landed none. Trout fishing was finicky but the trip was good recon and I’ll be better prepared next time.

Cranberry Lake

Cranberry Lake

Last Casts at Cranberry Lake

American River

In what has become an annual tradition, I head out to the American River Guard Station off Highway 410 near Naches, Washington every October to spend a weekend playing poker and fishing the American, Bumping, and Naches River for cutthroat. The cabin was built in 1941 and is available for rental  most of the year.

The American River runs alongside the site of the cabin and it’s easy hiking or short driving to holes, slots, and tail outs holding small to medium size cutthroat. On Saturday we drove along a road that paralleled the river and Highway 410 on the other side, exploring a road that wound through a few of the many campsites along that stretch. Hunters occupied the majority of the sites we saw that did have occupants and that the ample rain that started on Saturday afternoon pushed fisherman, hunters, and football fans into the comfy confines of the bar at Whistlin’ Jack Lodge.

We fished using ultralight spinning gear with #0 and #1 Mepps spinners being the lure of choice. I have caught more trout on the red and bronze Mepps than any other brand or color. They’ve worked for me in the Yakima, Skykomish, American, Bumping, Naches, Cle Elum, and Green River along with multiple high country, alpine lakes. When I’m not targeting stocked rainbows and in selective gear waters I’m using these small, red, Mepps spinners to catch wild trout.

 

Upper Yakima: Teanaway Mouth to Thorp Dam

I rafted the Upper Yakima River from the mouth of the Teanaway River to the diversion dam at Thorp on Saturday. We casted red #1 Mepps spinners almost all day, with some occasional bronze ones thrown into the mix. The fishing was incredible, with the hits coming on nearly every cast over some stretches. We got a late start and were hustling to make the take-out for most of the day. Regardless we landed and released around a dozen small rainbows and I caught a cutthroat during a layover on shore while we snacked and rested. The large fish of the day was a 16″ rainbow that I hooked on the water and ran multiple times under my pontoon and back up the river.

Lake Crescent Beardslees

P1070830I camped two nights at Fairholme Campground in the Olympic Peninsula over last Sunday and Monday night and fished Lake Crescent for Beardslee Rainbows, catching two on Monday and catching only bites on Tuesday morning. I launched the pontoon from the Fairholme boat launch and was even able to moor it on the gas dock overnight. I fished the northwestern shore from the end of the lake sides campsites east and got consistent bites and many spotted fish along with the two landed. It was both eerie and fascinating spotting the blue backs of the trout following my spinner or meandering by below my pontoon. The water is clarity is an unreal blue, due to a lack of nitrogen in the water and the absence of any plant life in the lake because of it. There was a significant amount of insect activity right along shore and below overhanging trees, which is where most of the trout I saw were rising and feeding. The lake drops off deep very quickly and I stayed in the shallows, not wanting to troll without a depth finder. There is also a 2 oz. limit to your tackle. So I stuck to the surface feeders along shore and cast a bronze Mepps #1 spinner, which got all of the bites and both trout.

 

Lost Lake II

Camped and fished Lost Lake in Kittitas County with a buddy and our pontoons. We figured to slide into a camp site empty after the 4th of July weekend and were lucky enough to have the entire site and lake to ourselves. Fishing was great on Sunday night with lots of action and we looked forward to more of the same on Monday morning, but unfortunately the bite died down as the winds and temperature increased. It seems to be an evening fishery at Lost Lake during summer months, at least for the type of fishing we were doing with spinning gear. I bet a fly fisherman working the shore in the evening would see even more fish in the net.

Inside Passage Boat Camping