Tag Archives: northwest

Little Nestucca & Neskowin Rivers

Katlin and I drove to Pacific City, Oregon for Memorial Day and I got a chance to fly fish for the first time in two of the several rivers that empty into the ocean near there. The drive in along winds along Little Nestucca Road and includes several points where the narrow road funnels across one-lane bridge crossings across the river. At each of these bridges on the way in I had a chance to check out some nice pools that had me chomping at the bit as I formulated an easy way to break it to Katlin once we landed at her folks’ house that I was going to be taking my fly gear back there to get a line wet. The moment arrived and with some support from her Dad, I made my exit and headed back up to scout the bridge crossings a bit more and find a good spot to access the river safely. After a couple stops I found some proper access with decent pools and hiked down below a bridge and along the bank for a short while, posting up in a nice tailout that looked promising. I hadn’t fished drys yet, and was really curious about the presence (or not) of fish, so I tied on a nymph and let it swing through the tailout into a nice pool that formed below. The fish were there and what they lacked in size they made up for in abundance. I caught a small cutthroat on nearly every cast, took in the scenery, and then mosied on back to the house for BBQ and time with the family.

On Sunday I was promised that I’d get a shot at fishing the Kellow Farm in Hebo, Oregon. The farm was about a fifteen minute drive from where we were staying and was on a nice stretch of the Neskowin RIver, above the hatchery but still the possibility of seeing a late Spring Chinook lurking in a big hole that formed just down the driveway from the farmhouse. I had caught a big Coho there two Christmas’ ago in that hole. There weren’t any big fish to be seen, so I waded across the river and upstream a bit, with the plan being to work my way down, through the big hole, and beyond to some water that I hadn’t seen before. There was nothing happening at the big hole, but downstream I found some promising water tight to the bank and switched to a dry fly. The dry was instantly hit on a cast tight to the opposite bank and I quickly caught two healthy rainbows which were much bigger than the cutthroat I’d been hooking the day before. Those two were the perhaps the biggest once around on the small part of the river I fished that day. It felt great landing my first two fish on a dry fly and great practice before I take on the Yakima here once my summer break begins.

 

On Monday we headed to the beach before the drive home to Seattle. I’ve always had this juvenile dream of driving on a beach and there’s no better than Tierra Del Mar north of Pacific City.

Offut Lake February 2015

With the weather as nice as it’s been I packed up my pontoon and headed an hour south back to Offut Lake in Tenino, Washington. I just recently purchased my first fly rod and reel and wanted to practice some casting, and perhaps get into one or two of the 900 Eells Springs Hatchery Cutthroat that were stocked in mid-January. While casting the flyrod I had another line in the water fishing from the bottom with bait for some of the rainbow trout that are put in the lake by both WDFW and the stocking program at Offut Lake Resort, who have their own pen at their dock. Thankfully my casting greatly improved over the course of the day as I recalled the large amounts of information gleamed from Youtube videos and got into a rhythm. Biggest challenge is being aware of where both my hands are at all times. I’m hoping that the difficulty added to the learning process by the fact that I was sitting down on the water all day will contribute to marked improvement once I get the chance to practice again while standing. I didn’t get any takes on the fly rod.  All I was doing was casting woolly buggers and letting them sink a bit before stripping them back in jerkily and I wasn’t expecting much this first time actually getting my fly line wet. I did however manage to get three rainbows in the net and missed one on an early hook set with my spinning rod/bottom fishing set-up. I have to say I’m pretty happy with the way that my trout fishing has developed since last spring when I really started going at it again. I’m seriously looking forward to moving beyond the bait and wait game and take my developing skills with fly fishing up into the alpine lakes this summer and eastside rivers this spring.

Beaver Lake on Veterans Day

Two years ago I fished Beaver Lake after WDFW stocked it with, if my memory serves me right, 3000 brood stock rainbow trout and landed one big one. This past Tuesday, Veterans Day, I fished Beaver again. WDFW had stocked it over the last week with 3-5 lb trout and I was on them all morning. It was cold and windy on the lake and twice my anchor was pulled by the wind and I found myself drifting steadily along, anchor swinging or dragging below me. I steadily caught fish from 8am to 1pm and had to keep my limit as I was using bait. These are true football trout and they fought well, peeling line off on multiple runs at times. A couple of the larger ones, with one of my keepers in particular, being responsible for the longest fights I’ve ever had while fishing for trout. I was using 4 lb test mainline strung on an ultralight St. Croix 2-piece and my bottom fishing trout rig. I was fishing from my pontoon and the wind would have been trouble without the anchor system and Minn Kota trolling motor.

Faraday Lake

Faraday Lake is an hour outside of Portland, Oregon and is a small, 26 acre lake formed by a diversion dam on the Clackamas River. The dam has a fish ladder that allows salmon and steelhead to make their way through the lake as they head up the Clackamas. A friend and I fished for stocked trout at Faraday in a mix of sunshine and rain, catching 7 between the two of us in the 12″-14″ range. Our spot actually had some flow two it in the center channel of the lake and would have been prime float fishing if I had brought my centerpin gear. All of our luck with trout came on bait from the bottom and we did manage to spot some coho lazily floating by in the shallower water close to shore.

 

 

American River

In what has become an annual tradition, I head out to the American River Guard Station off Highway 410 near Naches, Washington every October to spend a weekend playing poker and fishing the American, Bumping, and Naches River for cutthroat. The cabin was built in 1941 and is available for rental  most of the year.

The American River runs alongside the site of the cabin and it’s easy hiking or short driving to holes, slots, and tail outs holding small to medium size cutthroat. On Saturday we drove along a road that paralleled the river and Highway 410 on the other side, exploring a road that wound through a few of the many campsites along that stretch. Hunters occupied the majority of the sites we saw that did have occupants and that the ample rain that started on Saturday afternoon pushed fisherman, hunters, and football fans into the comfy confines of the bar at Whistlin’ Jack Lodge.

We fished using ultralight spinning gear with #0 and #1 Mepps spinners being the lure of choice. I have caught more trout on the red and bronze Mepps than any other brand or color. They’ve worked for me in the Yakima, Skykomish, American, Bumping, Naches, Cle Elum, and Green River along with multiple high country, alpine lakes. When I’m not targeting stocked rainbows and in selective gear waters I’m using these small, red, Mepps spinners to catch wild trout.

 

Lake Takhlakh

Camped up at Lake Takhlakh for Labor Day weekend and the fishing was consistent if not abundant. The stocked rainbows were on the small side although I caught two brood stock fish that were close to two pounds each. I left the pontoon moored on the shore of the lake all weekend.

 

Upper Yakima: Teanaway Mouth to Thorp Dam

I rafted the Upper Yakima River from the mouth of the Teanaway River to the diversion dam at Thorp on Saturday. We casted red #1 Mepps spinners almost all day, with some occasional bronze ones thrown into the mix. The fishing was incredible, with the hits coming on nearly every cast over some stretches. We got a late start and were hustling to make the take-out for most of the day. Regardless we landed and released around a dozen small rainbows and I caught a cutthroat during a layover on shore while we snacked and rested. The large fish of the day was a 16″ rainbow that I hooked on the water and ran multiple times under my pontoon and back up the river.