Tag Archives: spinner

Seep Lakes 2016

With new pontoon in tow I headed out to camp at Potholes State Park and fish the Seep Lakes over the weekend of April 9th-11th. I had fished a few of the lakes two years ago around the same time of year. WDFW describes the lakes as “within the ‘channeled scablands’ of Eastern Washington, that were created by ice age floods during the Pleistocene Epoch.” In less poetic but more descriptive text, they are a group of over 50 lakes that were formed when the Potholes Reservoir was formed and the water starting moving through the water table and arising from the desert south-east of the reservoir.

Potholes Site #84

Not a lot has been written in the way of consistent fishing reports from the lakes. What is known that various of the lakes have been stocked a few times over the last ten years, with some holding big trout and some holding none. It is also known that some of the lakes were poisoned at one point or another over the last five years in order to clear out carp that had found their way in via the irrigation channels connected to the Columbia. It was hard for me to get any clear timeline of what had been poisoned and when. This made it hard to be confident in the only two lakes that we chose to fish during our time there. There was barely any surface activity and depths were scratched out for us via Scott’s sonar, which were helpful to know in colored up water.

Launch at Carol Lake

We fished Corral on Saturday from mid-morning to after lunchtime. It’s a longer lake with pocketed channels and typical rocky points and walls which is where we concentrated our efforts. I fished a spinner that Scott had made with a black snowman body and wide, heavy gold Colorado blade. Scott found me a drop off on the sonar and marked some fish. I was having oar issues and stubbornly left my motor at home so that I could experience the ride of my new watercraft.   I dropped anchor and cast into the deep, let the spinner sink for about 10-15 seconds and slowly reeled. My thought was that the spinner would be reeled in at an angle matching the incline of the bottom towards where I was anchored. I was thinking too much.  There was a fair amount of snags to be had and the water clarity was a bit rough.  Regardless, I hooked a  nice fish close to 9am and then nothing the rest of the day.

Corral Lake Lunker

After a siesta we stacked the pontoons on my truck and headed to Blythe Lake, which is just a hop over the hill from Corral. Blythe is smaller and more manageable in a pontoon or float tube, had some great structure and scenery, but was a soupy mess from aquatic plants coloring up the water. About an hour before sunset there was an intense gnat hatch along with some emerging insects of some sort that brought on our first real surface activity of the day. What I was convinced was the same fish made it’s way from the boat launch south across the lake, periodically coming up for a thrashing gulp. We got zero bites but were somehow satisfied that at least we knew they were there. The lake had not been poisoned.

Blythe Lake

Below is a map of the area. The first lake is a few minutes away from Potholes. The Clark-Skamania Flyfishers were a great resource and I would encourage taking at least a couple days and buddies to try and hit as many lakes as you can. I’d like to take a trip there in the fall with some time set aside for hiking in to some of the lakes only accessible by foot.

 

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Three Rivers October Cutthroat

I visited my girlfriends family in Pacific City, Oregon last weekend and always take the time to head up to their family farm in Hebo, Oregon. The farm lies sits along the Little Nestucca River and I’ve caught coho and trout on spoons and flys out of the small stretch adjacent to the farm. I only had about an hour to fish last Sunday morning and managed to catch a nice resident cutthroat on a spinner made by my buddy. It was a beautiful fish, a bit skinny which makes me think it may be a post-spawn sea run cutthroat, but may have just been a bigger resident fish. When I arrived at the hole there was a big heron fishing upstream from me and you can see the slash marks on this fish where it had likely escaped a heron’s strike at least a couple of times. The sign is from the fisherman-friendly Inn at Pacific City where we stayed Saturday night.

Rattlesnake Lake

I fished for fours in a downpour today at Rattlesnake Lake. The plan was to hike the shoreline, but once I arrived and the wind was minimal, I assembled my pontoon and headed out about 150 yards from the boat launch. I caught my first trout on a fly. A red beaded, grizzly hackled, brown tailed wooly bugger that I cast and stripped back in. My casting is improving and I learned a lot today. I used that fly all day and landed four on it. I also had my ultralight spinning rod and was getting bites every other cast on a red Mepps spinner. I landed another five on the spinner. The lake was very active with trout, they were jumping all around all afternoon. The water was bright green and not as murky as would be expected with all of the rain. A great day fishing and I’m glad to have made despite the last two days of rain.  There was only one other angler on the water and he was catching his share too with a nymph below an indicator.

Upper Yakima: Teanaway Mouth to Thorp Dam

I rafted the Upper Yakima River from the mouth of the Teanaway River to the diversion dam at Thorp on Saturday. We casted red #1 Mepps spinners almost all day, with some occasional bronze ones thrown into the mix. The fishing was incredible, with the hits coming on nearly every cast over some stretches. We got a late start and were hustling to make the take-out for most of the day. Regardless we landed and released around a dozen small rainbows and I caught a cutthroat during a layover on shore while we snacked and rested. The large fish of the day was a 16″ rainbow that I hooked on the water and ran multiple times under my pontoon and back up the river.

Thundering Down The Yakima River

On Saturday I floated down the Yakima River with a friend and his brother.  Katlin and I headed to Cle Elum early on Saturday morning to meet up, and to stock up on snacks and drinks.  The float took close to four hours and we saw both sun and thunderstorms, and always mosquitoes.  The temperature was perfect the whole time.  I floated in a an inflatable kayak and I wouldn’t want to have done it in do it injust an inner tube.  The Yakima has world class rainbow trout fishing and I brought my rod and reel and managed to catch a little guy on my second cast of the day.  See more photos from the day here or by clicking on one of the shots below.